Gothic for Goths Lesson 05: The Script

Gutiska Razda faur gutans.  (“Gutins Nahts In” – Goth’s Night In)

Ƕar gaggiþ hija naht?
Where are you going tonight?

Weis hugjum du gaggan us du láikan in þamma gutakluƀin.
We’re thinking about going out dancing at the goth club.

Silđaleikō! Ik liuƀa du plinsjan! Gamōtu ik miþ izwis?
Great!  I love dancing! Can I come with you?

Ik ni wáit ita... Raiđa meina ist filuleitila.
I dunno... My car is really small.

Niu ist mis rūmis?
Isn’t there (any) room for me?

Nē.  Sunjaƀa, ik ni wilja þatei þu in raiđōn meinai iupana riukais.
No.  Actually, I just don’t want you smoking in my car again.

Ik ni riuka swafilu!
I don’t smoke so much!

Wērleikō? 
srsly?

Haƀaiđēđjau’k áinata niukilō wiþra ƕōh siǥaraíta þōei þu aíw garáukt,  wēsjau’k dáuþs.
If I had a nickel for every cigarette you smoked, I’d be dead.

Þata dáug. 
That’s okay. 

Gawizneiǥai sijuþ.  
Have fun.  

Ik gagga in waíhstan, áinakls, du grētan.
I’m going to the corner, alone, to cry. 

We’ve got a lot of important new words and concepts to go over, here,  so let’s get right to it.

Ƕar gaggiþ hija naht?

Gaggiþ, you (all) go, is the second person plural form of gaggan, which you already know.

Hija naht
Tonight. This is going to be a contentious one for some of the gothic purists out there.  I’ll be happy to describe how I arrived at this particular declension at another time.  Feel free to leave me a nasty comment about it.

Weis hugjum du gaggan us du láikan in þamma gutaklubin.
There’s a lot going on in this sentence.

Hugjan
To think about,  to consider, to ponder

Us
Out

Láikan
To dance, to frolick

Gutakluƀin: The dative of:
Gutaklubs
Goth club.  (Bring it, purists.)  <[I believe that in proper gothic the nominative would probably be gutaklufs, but since this isn’t a traditional gothic word, here I’m following the laws of assimilation.]

Silđaleikō! Ik liuƀa du plinsjan! Gamōtu ik miþ izwis?

Liuƀan
To love

Plinsjan
To dance

Gamōtan
May, Might, to have permission. This is a new type of verb we haven’t yet discussed, known as a preterite-present verb.  We have them in english, too, though not all of the same ones.  One important thing to know about preterite-present verbs, in gothic, and in all germanic languages, including english, is that when you use them in conjunction with an infinitive verb, you don’t need to add an infinitive marker.  For instance here, in english you would say “May I come with you,” not “May I to come with you.”

Miþ
With.  Now,  you may be thinking I forgot a word in this sentence.  Another interesting phaenomenon of preterite-present verbs is that they imply motion.  That is to say, if you don’t use another verb,  it already implies “to come” or “to go.”

Ik ni wáit ita...  Raiđa meina ist filuleitila...

Ik wáit
I know.  From the preterite-present verb witan.

Ita
It

Raiđa
Car or vehicle.  You may remember this from lesson one – this is the name of the gothic letter R.

Filuleitils
Really small.  The word filu, meaning great or much, (related to the german word “viel”), can be 
tacked onto the beginning of an adjective to mean “really” or “very.”

Niu ist mis rūmis?

Rūms
Room, space.  Rūmis is the genitive of rūms.

Otherwise, you already know all the words in this sentence, but they’re in an order you might not quite recognize.  

“Niu ist” we know means “isn’t?” 
“Mis” here is the dative, which as I’ve mentioned implies the preposition “to” or “than,” although in this case,  in english anyway, we would say “for me.”  Rūmis is also in the genitive case, so this sentence Could be translated literally as “Isn’t (there) for-me of-room?”

Nē.  Sunjaƀa, ik ni wilja þatei þu in raiđōn meinai iupana riukais.

Ne
No

Sunjaƀa
Really, actually, honestly

Wiljan
To want

Þatei
That.  We’ve already learned that þatei means “if,” but in this case it means “that.”

Iupana
Again,  over again

Riukan
To smoke

Þu riukis
You smoke

Þu riukais
(That) you smoke.  This is a new verb form known as the subjunctive case.  If you speak french, you’ll probably already know all about it, but if not, let’s not worry about it for right now.

Ik ni riuka swafilu!

Swafilu
So much

Wērleikō
Really, truly

Haƀaiđēđjau’k áinata niukilō wiþra ƕōh sigaraíta þōei þu ráukt, wēsjau’k dáuþs.

Haƀaiđēđjau ik. This is the past subjunctive form of the verb “haƀan.”  It means “had I,” or “If I had.”

Áinata
One

Niukilō
Nickel

Wiþra
Against, for

Ƕōh
Each, every

Sigaraíta
Cigarette

Þōei
That, which.  This is the feminine form of that already extremely useful word, þatei.

Aíw
Ever

Garáukt
You have smoked.  This is the past tense of the class two strong verb riukan.

Wēsjau ik. Like haƀaiđēđjau ik, wēsjau ik is the past subjunctive of the verb wisan. Here it means “I would be.”

Dáuþs
Dead

Þata dáug. Gawizneiǥai sijuþ.

Þata 
That.  The basis of our word þatei.

Dáug.  From the preterite-present verb duǥan, this means “that’s okay,” “that’s sufficient,” or “that’s fine.”

Gawizneiǥs
Having fun, enjoying together

Ik gagga in waíhstan, áinakls, du grētan

Waíhsta
Corner

Áinakls
Alone,  lonely

Grētan
To cry, to weep.

And so, our sad smoking goth turns out to be a tragic emo kid, sulking in the corner.